Coronavirus in perspective.

7/9/2020: To date there have been 544,739 deaths due to the coronavirus.
covid19.who.int/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwgJv4BRCrARIsAB17JI59AtdDLhLPtxu0fad1zakLXArmfNrNmzXCXrFRxomaayLunQbmhlgaAvMgEALw_wcB

To put this in perspective see the following from:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6747855/#bibr6-1176934319876938

Influenza A is one of the deadliest infectious diseases in human history, and it can be ranked equally with the bubonic plague in the ability to create large-scale fear and terror despite the great effort of humans to control it.1-3 From the first outbreak in 1918, called the “Spanish flu” and caused by the H1N1 strain, influenza A has killed 4 to 5 times more people than the number of casualties in World War I.

The following site estimated 50 million died, one-third of the world’s population at that time.

www.livescience.com/spanish-flu.html

In 1957, the Asian flu, caused by influenza A H2N2, began in China and spread around the world, killing 1.1 million people in total.3

Ten years later, a new strain of H3N2 lead to the eruption of a new pandemic called the “Hong Kong flu” that caused the death of 1 million people.3

In 2009, the strain that caused a deadly pandemic in World War I returned with a new type called H1N1pdm09; the result was approximately 575,000 deaths.3 Along with the deadly strains that infect humans, other strains, like H5N1, cause problems that can indirectly and catastrophically effect humans.4 The H5N1 outbreak appeared in Vietnam in 2003 when a massive avian infection led to the forcible killing of poultries, crippling the agriculture industry.4

Le KP, Do PC, Amaro RE, Le L. Molecular Docking of Broad-Spectrum Antibodies on Hemagglutinins of Influenza A Virus. Evol Bioinform Online. 2019;15:1176934319876938. Published 2019 Sep 16. doi:10.1177/1176934319876938.

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